Save the animals

Go on a learning trip to know more about the threatened species found in the biodiversity hotspots that you can help protect through TiME.

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Chocó Forest,Ecuador

The Jaguar

Jaguar

Jaguars are considered Near Threatened and live in South and Central America, especially in the forests and wetlands of the the Amazon basin. With a body length of up to 1.85 m or 6 ft 1 in (the height of a large refrigerator), it is the largest cat species in the Americas and the third largest in the world. And that’s not the only thing that sets this species apart from other felid species: jaguars are good swimmers!

Fun fact: Jaguars’ spots are shaped like roses and are called rosettes.

 

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The Jaguar

Brown-headed Spider Monkey

Brown-headed Spider monkeys are Critically Endangered! The remaining populations live in the treetops of sub-tropical and tropical forests in Ecuador and Colombia in groups of 20 to 30. Brown-headed Spider Monkeys mainly eat the fruit that grows in the tree canopy.

Fun fact: The tails of Brown-headed Spider Monkeys are much longer than their bodies!

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The Jaguar

Great Green Macaw

There are only 500-1,000 Great Green Macaws left on the planet so they are considered Critically Endangered. This large type of parrot lives in the tropical forests of Central and South America, including Ecuador, often in pairs or a small flock.

Fun fact: The Great Green Macaw’s favorite food is almonds (from the tree Dipteryx panamemsis).

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Tapichalaca Reserve,Ecuador

The Jaguar

Jocotoco Antpitta

There are only 480-600 Jocotoco Antpitta left on this planet, and they are considered Endangered. This bird lives in the forests of Ecuador and Peru, but is very shy and was only discovered in 1997.

Fun fact: The name Jocotoco came from the sound the bird makes, which is a drawn-out series of single hoots (think JO…CO…TO…CO)

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The Jaguar

Spectacled Bear

There are only 2,500-10,000 Spectacled Bears left on this planet, and they are considered Vulnerable to extinction. Spectacled bears are the only surviving species of bear native to South America, and this mid-sized bear lives primarily in the Andes Mountains.

Fun Fact: The pattern and extent of the white- and yellowish-colored markings are slightly different on each individual bear.

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The Jaguar

Mountain Tapir

There are only 2,500 Mountain Tapirs left on this planet, and they are considered Endangered. This large mammal (adults are almost 2 m or 6 ft long!) lives in Ecuador, Colombia and Peru.

Fun fact: Mountain Tapirs have four toes on each front foot and three toes on each back foot.

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Reserva Natural Los Magnolios,Colombia

The Jaguar

Silvery-brown Tamarin

The Silvery-brown Tamarin ONLY lives in the forests of Colombia and is Vulnerable to extinction. It is a primate and lives high in the forest canopy, using its four limbs to swing through the trees.

Fun fact: a baby Silvery-brown Tamarin is carried on the back of its mother or father for 18 months!

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The Jaguar

Andean Poison Frog

The Andean Poison Frog ONLY lives in the forests of Colombia and is Vulnerable to extinction. They are tiny, less than 2 cm (or 1 in) long.

Fun fact: The Andean Poison Frog makes a buzz sound, and males like to do so from a secret location: under leaves, beneath roots of trees, and from inside some plants.

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The Jaguar

Handley’s Slender Opossum

Handley’s Slender Opossum ONLY lives in the forests of Colombia and is Critically Endangered. Scientists know very little about this small (only 11 cm or 4 in!) marsupial.

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