Sharing is caring — or is it really?

Sharing is caring —or is it really? The risks and benefits of publishing biodiversity data “Do not publish,” a great article printed in the journal Science last year, discussed the dangers of publishing critical data concerning the location of endangered species. Authors David Lindenmayer and Ben Scheele argued that poachers trawl through scientific papers, searching for information…

The ecological impact of war in Africa

Today’s declining number of large mammals around the world has been explained by many factors, including low reproductive rates, habitat destruction, and overhunting. However, uncertainties about the effects of armed conflict has complicated conservation planning and priority-setting efforts. In the past 70 years, humans have waged war continuously in the world’s most biodiverse regions. Between…

A visit to TiME’s first biodiversity hotspot land purchase

“Please, Nestor, please continue to point out the orchid flowers,” I cried almost breathlessly to the CEO of Neotropical Primate Conservation (NPC) while we climbed up the land TiME had just purchased. “You know we both need these stops so we can catch our breath.” Nestor Allgas and I were trying to keep pace with…

Newsletters links

I spoke with our WP volunteer, Orit Landsman whether she can link our newsletters to the website. Orit immediately got to the task and soon developed a link to all our wonderful newsletters. It is then occurred to me that we already sent 18 (!) such newsletters. This is a perfect opportunity to thank our…

Protecting megafauna and raising money for conservation

This piece was published in our March 2017 newsletter: Earlier this month, BioScience published a paper discussing the merits of focusing on mammalian megafauna (large or giant animals) when planning conservation projects. The authors suggest that prioritizing such iconic animals will benefit conservation efforts across the board. In particular, they argue: These large mammals usually…

Gold in Africa – an interview with Henry Gold, TiME board member

For TiME’s February 2017 newsletter we interviewed board member Henry Gold, co-founder of Canadian Physician for Aid and Relief (CPAR)and TDA Global Cycling: You worked in Africa for quite a few years. Can you tell us what kind of work you were doing? I’m trained as an engineer, but in 1984 I quit engineering and…

Chatting with Jasmine, a 12-year old TiME supporter

We spoke to Jasmine, daughter of two of TiME’s Board of Directors, Ondine Sherman and Dror Ben-Ami. She recently donated 1800 NIS (about 470 USD) to TiME, nearly a third of the gift money she received for her Bat Mitzvah. First of all, we asked Jasmine to explain a Bat Mitzvah: Jasmine: “In Jewish culture,…

Ivory Belongs to Elephants

Since the dawn of humanity, we have been actively fighting nature: drying swamps, cutting down forests, using strong pesticides (such as DDT) and hunting wildlife to extinction (think of the dodo, Tasmanian tiger, passenger pigeon and many, many more). Today, experts believe that we are facing a sixth mass extinction, which is entirely attributable to…

This is My Earth in Kenya with Professor Uri Shanas

The following interview with founder and co-chair Uri Shanas was published in our August 2016 newsletter:   Hello, Uri. You’ve recently returned from Kenya. Can you tell us why you went? Kenya is one of the last places on earth where one can experience nature in all its might and beauty, so I was excited to visit…